19 Different Types of Jack Fish

Different types of jack fish species

Jack fish are interesting creatures known for their unique appearances and wide variety. The term “jack fish” refers to different kinds of fish in the Carangidae family — the family also known as the ‘jack’ family.

These fish are strong and move fast, which is why many anglers find it challenging to catch them.

In this article, we’re going to talk about 19 different types of jack fish species. Let’s get started!

19 Types of Jack Fish

1. Bar Jack

Bar Jack fish
Scientific Name:Caranx ruber
Common Names:Bar jack, blue-striped cavalla, passing jack, red jack
Habitat:Clear, shallow waters above coral reefs; young ones often near Sargassum seaweed
Range:Western Atlantic from New Jersey to southern Brazil, especially common in the West Indies
Size:7.5–29 inches (19–74 cm)
Weight:1–18 pounds (0.4–8 kg)
Diet:Small fish, shrimp, and various small sea creatures
Lifespan:Around 13 years
Unique Features:Shiny blue or green back, long body, and a noticeable dark stripe down its back

The bar jack is a fascinating fish found mainly in the clear, shallow waters above coral reefs of the Western Atlantic, stretching from New Jersey all the way down to southern Brazil. 

They’re particularly abundant in the West Indies. What makes these fish stand out is their appearance: they have a shiny blue or green back and a distinctive dark stripe running down their long body. 

In terms of size, bar jacks can range anywhere from 7.5 to 29 inches and weigh between 1 and 18 pounds

Their diet is quite varied, including small fish, shrimp, and various small sea creatures.

2. Black Jack

Black Jack Trevally fish
Scientific Name:Caranx lugubris
Common Names:Black jack, black trevally, black kingfish
Habitat:Deep reef environments, sometimes near the surface
Range:Tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans
Size:Up to 28 inches (71 cm)
Weight:Up to 11 pounds (5 kg)
Diet:Small fish, squids, and crustaceans
Lifespan:Not well-documented
Unique Features:Dark, almost black body; large, elongated body with deeply forked tail

The black jack is a type of jack fish often found in deep reef environments, though it occasionally swims near the surface. These fish inhabit the tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans.

With a large, elongated body and a deeply forked tail, they are easy to spot. They primarily feed on small fish, squids, and crustaceans, showing off their diverse and opportunistic feeding habits. 

While their exact lifespan isn’t well-documented, only a fraction of the population survives to reach adulthood. 

In terms of size, black jacks can grow up to 28 inches in length and weigh as much as 11 pounds. Their dark, almost black body not only gives them their name but also distinguishes them from other jack fish.

3. Blue Runner

Blue Runner jack fish
Scientific Name:Caranx crysos
Common Names:Blue runner, hardtail jack, bluestripe jack, Egyptian scad
Habitat:Coastal waters, often around reefs and wrecks
Range:Western Atlantic: Nova Scotia to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea
Size:Usually under 10 inches (35 cm) but may reach up to 28 inches (71 cm)
Weight:5–11 pounds (2.2–5 kg)
Diet:Small fish, squids, zooplankton
Lifespan:Up to 11 years
Unique Features:Blue-green back with silver sides, prominent lateral line, small scales

Also known as hardtail jack or Egyptian scad, the blue runner jack fish is easy to spot with its blue-green back and silver sides. 

They feature a prominent lateral line on their side and have relatively small scales compared to other jack fish. 

These fish are found in the Western Atlantic, from Nova Scotia to Brazil. They are fond of hanging around coasts, especially near reefs and old shipwrecks. 

Size-wise, they can get pretty big, up to 28 inches long, and weigh as much as 11 pounds; however, most individuals only grow to roughly 10 inches and around 5 pounds

Their diet includes smaller fish, squids, and tiny zooplankton. In terms of lifespan, blue runners can live for up to 11 years.

4. Crevalle Jack

Crevalle Jack fish
Scientific Name:Caranx hippos
Common Names:Crevalle jack, common jack, black-tailed trevally, couvalli jack, jack crevalle
Habitat:Coastal waters, often in brackish estuaries and harbors
Range:Atlantic Ocean: from Nova Scotia, Canada, to Uruguay, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea
Size:20–40 inches (51–101 cm)
Weight:Up to 56 pounds (25 kg)
Diet:Fish, shrimp, and other invertebrates
Lifespan:Up to 17 years
Unique Features:Prominent black spot on the gill cover, yellowish fins, a muscular, deep-bodied look

Another jack fish that lives near the coast is the crevalle jack. 

These fish are often in areas where rivers meet the sea, particularly in the waters of Nova Scotia in Canada, down to Uruguay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea. 

They are usually 20 to 40 inches long and can weigh as much as 56 pounds. They eat a variety of things, like small fish, shrimp, and other tiny sea creatures. 

You can easily spot them by the big black mark on their gill cover and their yellow fins. Just one look at this fish, and you’ll know that it is a strong one, especially those in the larger end.

Crevalle jacks can live for up to 17 years, making them a pretty familiar sight in their natural habitats.

Meanwhile, there’s a debate among fishers about the taste of crevalle jacks. Some don’t like it, but others love its special flavor.

5. Giant Trevally

Giant Trevally
Scientific Name:Caranx ignobilis
Common Names:Giant trevally, GT, lowly trevally, barrier trevally, ulua
Habitat:Tropical oceanic waters, reefs, and atolls
Range:Indo-Pacific region from South Africa to Hawaii, including Japan, Australia, and the eastern coast of Africa
Size:33–67 inches (84–170 cm)
Weight:33–176 pounds (15–80 kg)
Diet:Crustaceans, cephalopods, and fish
Lifespan:Up to 24 years
Unique Features:Powerful, elongated body, silvery color with occasional dark spots, most adults are solitary

The giant trevally, or GT, is a big fish found in the warm waters of the Indo-Pacific. They live in places from South Africa to Hawaii, including the coasts of Japan, Australia, and eastern Africa. 

These fish can grow up to 67 inches long and weigh as much as 176 pounds, making them among the largest types of jack fish. They reach roughly 30% to 60% of their full-grown size at around 3 to 5 years of age.

They often eat crustaceans, cephalopods, and smaller fish. Usually, they live up to 24 years, but according to newer findings, they are able to live up to 25. 

They are easy to recognize thanks to their strong, long bodies and silver color, often adorned with dark spots. These fish usually prefer being alone, especially adults.

Occasionally, adult giant trevallies come to hunt in groups, especially in areas where there is a lot of prey. They also eat birds.

Watch this video to see how giant trevallies hunt:

Predator fish leaps out of water to catch bird | Blue Planet II - BBC

6. Green Jack

Green Jack fish
Image credit: Kare Kare
Scientific Name:Caranx caballus
Common Names:Green jack, horse jack
Habitat:Found near coasts, in shallow waters, reefs, bays, river mouths, and lagoons
Range:Eastern Pacific Ocean, from Santa Cruz Island, California, to Peru, including the Galapagos Islands
Size:Around 15 inches (38 cm)
Weight:Up to 6.5 pounds (3 kg)
Diet:Eats small fish, squid, crabs, shrimp, other small sea creatures
Lifespan:Up to 8 years
Unique Features:Has a greenish-blue color with a dark blue back and a golden to grey belly; notable for a black mark near the gill cover

Also known as horse jack, the green jack stands out in its habitat with its unique greenish-blue color, a dark blue back, and a golden to grey belly.

Do not confuse them with the horse-eye jack, though, which is an entirely different species of jack fish!

Found along the Eastern Pacific Ocean, their home ranges from Santa Cruz Island in California to Peru, including the Galapagos Islands. They are often seen in shallow waters, reefs, and river mouths. 

Size-wise, green jacks measure around 15 inches and weigh roughly 6.5 pounds. Their usual diet includes small fish, squid, crabs, and shrimp. 

This varied diet allows them to find food regardless of where they are in their usual habitat. In terms of lifespan, these fish live up to 8 years.

7. Horse-Eye Jack

Horse Eye Jack fish
Scientific Name:Caranx latus
Common Names:Horse-eye jack, big-eye jack
Habitat:Found in deeper ocean areas, near offshore reefs, and sometimes in slightly salty water near rivers
Range:Subtropical Atlantic, from Bermuda and the Gulf of Mexico to Brazil, and from St. Paul’s Rocks to Ascension Island in the eastern Atlantic
Size:24–40 inches (61–101 cm)
Weight:10–29.5 pounds (4.5–13.5 kg)
Diet:Fishes, shrimp, and other invertebrates
Lifespan:Up to 18 years
Unique Features:Has a dark blue to silver top, with a lighter, often golden underside; possible dark spots near gills; juveniles display about five dark side stripes

The horse-eye jack, often found in deep seas and near coral reefs, is a type of jack fish that can also be found in slightly salty water near rivers. 

These fish are quite large, typically reaching around 40 inches in length and weighing approximately 29.5 pounds at their larger end. Their diet consists of various smaller fish, shrimp, and other small sea creatures.

Known for their toughness, horse-eye jacks can live up to 18 years, making them among the longest-living types of jack fish. 

Their appearance is distinctive, with a dark blue to silver back and a lighter, sometimes golden belly. Juvenile horse-eye jacks are easily spotted by their five dark stripes on the sides.

I’ve had the chance to fish horse-eye jacks in the Atlantic. There, local anglers really pay close attention to protecting young fish. 

So, whenever we catch a fish with five dark stripes on the sides, we would quickly and carefully return it to the water. 

8. Yellow Jack

Yellow Jack fish
Scientific Name:Caranx bartholomaei
Common Names:Yellow jack, coolihoo
Habitat:Coastal waters, often around coral reefs
Range:Western Atlantic, from Massachusetts to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea
Size:20–30 inches (51–76 cm)
Weight:3–8 pounds (1.4–3.6 kg)
Diet:Small fish, squids, and crustaceans
Lifespan:Up to 6 years
Unique Features:Yellow-gold body color, elongated body, black spot on the gill cover

A yellow jack is a vibrant fish found mainly in coastal waters, especially near coral reefs. These fish stand out with their yellow-gold bodies and a distinct black spot on their gill cover. 

They are commonly seen from Massachusetts down to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. In terms of diet, these fish feast on small fish, squids, and small crustaceans. 

Yellow jacks usually reach 20 to 30 inches in length and weigh between 3 and 8 pounds. In terms of lifespan, they typically live for about 6 years, making them quite short-lived.

To see how anglers catch yellow jack fish and prepare some for cooking, watch this video: 

BIG Yellow Jack - FISH - Catch Clean and Cook

9. Bigeye Trevally

Bigeye Trevally
Scientific Name:Caranx sexfasciatus
Common Names:Bigeye trevally, great trevally, six-banded trevally
Habitat:Coral reefs, lagoons, and open waters
Range:Indo-Pacific region, from the Red Sea to Hawaii and the Marquesas Islands
Size:24–35 inches (61–89 cm)
Weight:4–18 pounds (1.8–8 kg)
Diet:Small fish, crustaceans, cephalopods
Lifespan:Up to 7 years
Unique Features:Large, prominent eyes; juveniles have distinct six vertical bands on the sides; silver-gray body color

The bigeye trevally, also known as six-banded trevally, is distinguished by six vertical bands that mark its silvery body, a feature that adds to its unique visual appeal. These bands are more pronounced in juveniles and can fade as the fish matures.

These jack fish feature sleek, silver-colored bodies that shine underwater, catching the eye of both predators and prey. Their most notable characteristic is the large, pronounced eyes that give them their name.

They are usually seen in the vast marine areas of the Indo-Pacific, from the Red Sea all the way to Hawaii and the Marquesas Islands. They usually hang around coral reefs and lagoons, but they also frequent the open sea. 

When it comes to size, they grow to be about 24 to 35 inches long and can weigh between 4 and 18 pounds. Their diet includes small fish, crustaceans, and cephalopods. 

Bigeye trevallies have a brief lifespan of up to 7 years.

10. Bluefin Trevally

Bluefin Trevally
Scientific Name:Caranx melampygus
Common Names:Bluefin jack, bluefin kingfish, bluefinned crevalle, omilu
Habitat:Coral reefs, lagoons, and open waters
Range:Indo-Pacific region, from East Africa to the Americas
Size:24–40 inches (61–102 cm)
Weight:8–24 pounds (3.6–11 kg)
Diet:Fish, crustaceans, cephalopods
Lifespan:Up to 7 years
Unique Features:Bright blue fins and spots, silver body, and a streamlined shape

A bluefin trevally is easily recognized by its bright blue fins and spots, which stand out against its silver body. These fish are usually found in coral reefs, lagoons, and open waters. 

Known for their size, they grow between 24 and 40 inches long and weigh from 8 to 24 pounds. They often thrive in the large Indo-Pacific region, from East Africa to the Americas. 

Their diet includes smaller fish, crustaceans, and cephalopods. Bluefin trevallies have a lifespan of up to 7 years. What’s impressive about these fish is that they grow quite big despite their relatively short lifespan.

This is likely because they use their hunting skills to eat a lot when they are young. This helps them reach their full-grown size at just less than 2 years old.

11. Greater Amberjack

Greater Amberjack fish
Scientific Name:Seriola dumerili
Common Names:Greater amberjack, amberjack, greater yellowtail, rock salmon
Habitat:Deep waters near reefs and wreck
Range:Worldwide in temperate and tropical waters
Size:24–70 inches (61–178 cm)
Weight:40–200 pounds (18–91 kg)
Diet:Fish, squid, crustaceans
Lifespan:Up to 17 years
Unique Features:Dark stripe from nose to front of dorsal fin, silvery-white underbelly, forked tail

The distinct dark stripe running from the nose to the front of the dorsal fin is a notable feature of the greater amberjack. 

These fish, known for their impressive size, can grow from 24 to 70 inches and weigh between 40 and 200 pounds

As a type of saltwater fish, they live in the deep waters across the world, especially near reefs and wrecks in both temperate and tropical seas. Their diet consists mostly of fish, squid, and crustaceans. 

With a silvery-white underbelly and a forked tail, they are easily recognizable. They can live up to 17 years, showing their impressive adaptability in their natural habitat.

Pro Tip: People often confuse greater amberjacks with other similar fish. To spot the difference, look for a dark stripe on the greater amberjack that goes from the snout, through the eye, to the dorsal fin. 

Another clue is the upper jaw shape; on greater amberjacks, it curves upwards towards the eye. Also, greater amberjacks have seven spines on their first dorsal fin.

12. Lesser Amberjack

Lesser Amberjack
Scientific Name:Seriola fasciata
Common Names:Lesser amberjack, false amberjack, little amberjack
Habitat:Offshore waters near rock outcrops and reefs
Range:Tropical and subtropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea
Size:18–24 inches (46–61 cm)
Weight:5–10 pounds (2.2–25 kg)
Diet:Small fish, squids, and crustaceans
Lifespan:Up to 5 years
Unique Features:Darker back with a silver-white belly and a distinct amber stripe running from the eye to the tail

The lesser amberjack stands out with its signature amber stripe extending from its eye to its tail. They also have a silver-white belly, a trait they share with greater amberjacks.

These fish make their home in warm tropical and subtropical areas of the Atlantic, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Mediterranean Sea. 

They typically reach a size of 18 to 24 inches and weigh around 5 pounds (in rare instances, they can reach around the 10-pound mark). Their diet mainly includes small fish, squids, and crustaceans. 

Lesser amberjacks have a lifespan of up to 5 years. They are often confused with greater amberjacks due to their similar build, colors, and dietary preferences. 

One thing to note, though, is that the eyes of lesser amberjacks are proportionally much larger than those of greater amberjacks.

13. Permit

Permit fish
Scientific Name:Trachinotus falcatus
Common Names:Permit
Habitat:Shallow, warm waters over sandy bottoms and near reefs
Range:Western Atlantic from Massachusetts to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea
Size:18–48 inches (46–122 cm)
Weight:Up to 40 pounds (18 kg)
Diet:Crabs, shrimp, small fish, and mollusks
Lifespan:Up to 23 years
Unique Features:Deep, flattened body with a small mouth, silver in color with a yellowish tinge on the belly

The permit fish, with its silver color and a touch of yellow on its belly, is a favorite among many anglers. They live in warm, shallow waters, often found over sandy sea floors and near reefs. 

These fish are mainly seen from Massachusetts to Brazil, including areas like the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. They eat a variety of foods, including crabs, shrimp, small fish, and mollusks. 

Size-wise, these fish can grow up to 48 inches long and weigh as much as 40 pounds. Impressively, they can live up to 23 years.

Some anglers don’t consider permit fish to be a type of jack fish. However, they are technically still part of the ‘jack’ family Carangidae, making them a worthwhile addition to our list. 

Plus, many newbie anglers often mistake permit fish for crevalle jacks — an experience I had when starting out. 

Since then, I’ve learned to distinguish them by keeping in mind that permits have a more slender, elongated body with a subtle silver color. 

Meanwhile, crevalle jacks are bulkier, featuring a prominent dark spot on the gill cover and more vibrant colors.

14. Florida Pompano

Florida Pompano fish
Scientific Name:Trachinotus carolinus
Common Names:Florida pompano, pompano, sunfish
Habitat:Coastal waters, sandy beaches, estuaries
Range:Western Atlantic from Massachusetts to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico
Size:12–17 inches (30–43 cm)
Weight:1–8 pounds (0.4–3.6 kg)
Diet:Crustaceans, mollusks, small fish
Lifespan:3–4 years, occasionally longer
Unique Features:Deep-bodied, silvery fish with yellow on the throat, belly, and pelvic and anal fins

The Florida pompano is a type of jack fish found along sandy shores and estuaries. These fish make their home in the Western Atlantic, from Massachusetts to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico. 

They stand out with their deep-bodied, silvery look and a touch of yellow on their throat, belly, and fins. Typically, they measure 12 to 17 inches and weigh between 1 and 8 pounds

Their diet includes crustaceans, mollusks, and small fish. Interestingly, they have pretty short lives, ranging only from 3 to 4 years. However, some individuals are recorded to live a bit longer.

Fun Fact: According to research conducted by the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI), at least 10,000 pounds of pompano per county are caught yearly in all coastal counties in Florida.

15. African Pompano

African Pompano fish
Scientific Name:Alectis ciliaris
Common Names:African pompano, pennant-fish, threadfin trevally
Habitat:Open waters, often near reefs or wrecks
Range:Tropical waters worldwide, especially prevalent in the Indo-Pacific
Size:18–35 inches (46–89 cm)
Weight:Up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg)
Diet:Small fish, crustaceans, squid
Lifespan:Up to 5 years
Unique Features:Long, thread-like extensions from dorsal and anal fins, especially in juveniles; silver body with a slight bluish tinge

Another eye-catching fish on our list is the African pompano, an inhabitant of the warm tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific.

They are easily recognized by their distinctive long, thread-like extensions, which go from their dorsal to anal fins. Interestingly, this telltale feature is mostly prominent in juvenile fish. 

African pompanos are commonly found swimming in open waters near reefs or wrecks. 

Their diet includes small fish, crustaceans, and squid. Size-wise, they grow to around 18 to 35 inches in length and can weigh up to 50 pounds

African pompanos belong to the genus Alectis and are known for their unique fin extensions and sleek bodies. 

Fun Fact: The name “Alectis” is inspired by Alecto, a Greek mythological figure, symbolizing the fish’s long fin filaments and aggressive behavior.

16. Rainbow Runner

Rainbow Runner fish
Scientific Name:Elagatis bipinnulata
Common Names:Rainbow runner, Spanish jack, Hawaiian salmon
Habitat:Open waters, often near floating objects or reefs
Range:Circumtropical, found in warm waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans
Size:Up to 47 inches (119.4 cm)
Weight:Up to 11 pounds (5 kg)
Diet:Small fish, squids, and plankton
Lifespan:Up to 9 years
Unique Features:Slender, elongated body with distinctive blue and yellow stripes along the sides

Another fascinating type of jack fish is the rainbow runner. Known for their elongated bodies with bright blue and yellow stripes, these fish make their home in the warm, open waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans.

They are often seen swimming near floating objects or reefs, where they hunt for small fish, squids, and plankton. 

Growing up to 47 inches and weighing as much as 11 pounds, these fish are on the larger end. They live for up to 9 years, thriving mainly in circumtropical regions

It’s easy to mistake the rainbow runner with the blue runner from the Caranx genus. However, rainbow runners have bright blue stripes running along their bodies, which the blue runner lacks. 

However, in terms of body shape, fin structure, and weight, these two types of jack fish are comparable.

17. Leather Jack

Leather Jack fish
Scientific Name:Oligoplites saurus
Common Names:Leather jack, leatherjacket, skipjack
Habitat:Coastal waters, estuaries, and bays
Range:Western Atlantic from New Jersey to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea
Size:8–16 inches (20.3–40.6 cm)
Weight:0.5–2 pounds (0.2–1 kg)
Diet:Small fish, crustaceans, and mollusks
Lifespan:Around 10 years
Unique Features:Silvery body with a distinctively leathery texture; dorsal and anal spines can inflict painful stings

The leather jack fish, with its unique silvery look and leathery skin, is commonly spotted along the Western Atlantic coast from New Jersey to Brazil. 

These small fish, usually measuring 8 to 16 inches long and weighing between 0.5 to 2 pounds, are often found in coastal waters, estuaries, and bays. 

Their diet consists of small fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. Known for their defensive dorsal and anal spines, leather jacks can give a painful sting

They are tough creatures, living up to about 10 years. Their resilience, combined with their unique defense mechanism, makes them a prominent species in their natural habitats.

18. Almaco Jack

Almaco Jack fish
Scientific Name:Seriola rivoliana
Common Names:Almaco jack, longfin yellowtail
Habitat:Open ocean, often near floating objects or reefs
Range:Globally in tropical and subtropical waters, common in the Atlantic Ocean
Size:Up to 59 inches (150 cm)
Weight:Up to 132 pounds (60 kg)
Diet:Fish, squids, and crustaceans
Lifespan:Up to 17 years
Unique Features:High dorsal fin, slender body, dark stripe from eye to tail

The almaco jack stands out with its tall dorsal fin and slim shape, marked by a unique dark stripe that extends from its eye to its tail. 

These fish are giants, growing up to 59 inches long and weighing as much as 132 pounds. They live in tropical and subtropical waters around the world, especially in the Atlantic Ocean. 

Preferring the vast open sea, they often gather near floating objects or reefs where there’s plenty of food. In terms of diet, they usually eat fish, squids, and crustaceans. 

Aside from their impressive size, almaco jacks are known for their longevity. These fish can live up to 17 years, making them one of the longest-living species on our list.

19. Banded Rudderfish

Banded Rudderfish
Image credit: SEFSC Pascagoula Laboratory
Scientific Name:Seriola zonata
Common Names:Banded rudderfish, pilotfish
Habitat:Coastal waters, often near wrecks or reefs
Range:Western Atlantic from Massachusetts to Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico
Size:20–30 inches (51–76 cm)
Weight:Up to 5 pounds (2.2 kg)
Diet:Small fish, squid, and zooplankton
Lifespan:Up to 5 years
Unique Features:Vertical bands on a slender body, yellowish tail, black spot near tail base

Marked by a black spot near the tail base, the banded rudderfish stands out with its distinctive vertical bands and a yellowish tail. These fish, commonly found in coastal waters, are fond of swimming near wrecks or reefs. 

They make their home in the vast Western Atlantic, ranging from Massachusetts to Brazil. Size-wise, these creatures grow to around 20 to 30 inches and weigh as much as 5 pounds

They have a varied diet, feeding on small fish, squid, and zooplankton. With a lifespan of up to 5 years, they are easily recognizable in their natural habitat.

Fun Fact: Rudderfish got their name because they like to follow ships and eat the leftovers they find. This unique habit makes them somewhat of the ocean’s cleanup crew.

Frequently Asked Questions

Several jack fish swimming together

Are Jack Fish Good to Eat?

Yes, jack fish are good to eat. Most of them have firm, white flesh that is safe to eat when prepared properly. They are often grilled, baked, or fried. 

Are Jack Fish Aggressive?

All jack fish can be aggressive, especially when they are hunting for prey. They are known for their strong and fast swimming, which helps them catch their food.

What Family Is Jack Fish?

Jack fish belong to the Carangidae family, also known as the jack family of fish. This family includes many different genera and species of fish, most of which are referred to as ‘jack fish.’

However, from a technical standpoint, jack fish primarily pertain to those in the Caranx genus, which is a specific genus within the Carangidae family.


So, what do you think about these different kinds of jack fish? Did you find this guide useful? Share your thoughts about jackfish with us by leaving a comment below!

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